10 Things You Didn’t Know About Malibu

February 1, 2016 1:36 PM

(credit: Malibu Farm)

(credit: Malibu Farm)


Malibu, the affluent beach city in LA nicknamed “the Bu,” is famous for its beautiful sandy beaches and exclusive home owners. Located just north of Santa Monica along the Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu is known for its splendor, and of course its 21 miles of beautiful beaches. Here are 10 things though you probably didn’t know about Malibu though.

 

(credit: Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock)

(credit: Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock)


1.) Malibu Is Actually 21 Miles Long, Not 27 Miles

While taking a drive on PCH, you may see signs around the city proclaiming “27 miles of scenic beauty”, but that in fact refers to Malibu’s original length before the city was incorporated in 1991. The coastline city actually spans only 21 miles along the Pacific.


 
(Credit: Elliott McGucken)

(Credit: Elliott McGucken)


2.) Malibu Consists Of 10 Different Beaches

The 21-mile strip on the Pacific coastline of Malibu is known for its warm sandy beaches, beautiful homes and celebrities. But, did you know that there are actually 10 differently named beaches in Malibu? They include Malibu Lagoon State Beach, Malibu Surfrider Beach, Dan Blocker Beach, Point Dume State Beach (which includes Big Dume), Westward Beach, Zuma Beach, La Piedra Beach, Nicholas Canyon Beach, El Pescador Beach and El Matador beach.


 
3.) Malibu Is Home To The First World Surfing Reserve

Malibu’s Surfrider Beach is the first World Surfing Reserve, which was dedicated in 2010. Surfrider Beach was selected as the first reserve due to the quality of its waves and its importance in the birth of modern surf culture. Today, it’s one of the most populated surfing spots because of this.


 
(Credit: City of Malibu)

(Credit: City of Malibu)


4.) Carbon Beach Is An Expensive Sandbox

Commanding upwards of $200,000 per foot of beachfront space, Carbon Beach is comprised of 70 separate lots stretching just less than a mile and half along PCH from the Malibu Pier towards Santa Monica. Nicknamed “Billionaire’s Beach,” it is home to the rich and famous, including Oracle’s Larry Ellison and entertainment mogul David Geffen.


 
5.) All Beaches Are Public

Until recently, Carbon Beach had been a mystery to the public. Some of the uber-wealthy living on the 70 lots have been accused of putting fake doors and painted curbs to keep that stretch of beach exclusive. As of last year though, the Carbon Beach West coastal access way, a 10-foot-wide concrete walkway between two large (and fenced) Malibu mansions, was opened to the public. After years in court, conservationists finally won and the path was opened to the public that lets you walk from the Pacific Coast Highway to the actual beach.


 
(credit: Malibu Wines)

(credit: Malibu Wines)


6.) Malibu Is Home To Some Pretty Great Wineries & A Safari Tour Too

There are several vineyards and wineries in Malibu, one of them being Malibu Family Wines. Malibu Family Wines is located in the mountains where guests can take a grand adventure around the 1,000 acre vineyard in a custom safari vehicle, feed exotic animals like alpacas, llamas, zebras and more. In addition, guests get to enjoy wine pairings along the way. Open seven days a week, visitors can also go to the beautiful outdoor tasting ‘room’, bring picnic materials, and purchase wine by the bottle, all while taking in the breathtaking views.


 
(Credit: City of Malibu)

(Credit: City of Malibu)


7.) Malibu’s Original Name Was “Humaliwo”

Settled by the Chumash Indians, what is now called Malibu was originally named “Humaliwo” or “the surf sounds loudly” in their native language. For nearly 4,000 years Malibu was inhabited by Chumash Indians, Ventureño Chumash to be exact, until Spanish Settler Jose Bartoleme Tapia made the first legal claim to land in Malibu in 1802. You may not notice it, but there is still a Chumash presence in the community. In fact, each Spring, there is a large Chumash Pow Wow at Bluffs Park.


 
8.) Frederick & May Rindge Owned Malibu From The 1800s to 1938

Frederick Rindge, the businessman and multi-millionaire who founded the Conservative Life Insurance Company (now Pacific Life), was a vice president of Union Oil Company, and a director of the Los Angeles Edison Electric Company (later Southern California Edison Company), and his wife actually owned the entire 27-mile-long Malibu coastline. Only in 1929, when the widowed May Rindge encountered money problems after fighting the state, did she open the Malibu Colony to the public, inviting a few wealthy celebrities in to build vacation homes.


 
(Credit: City of Malibu)

(Credit: City of Malibu)


9.) Rhoda Adamson, The Daughter Of Frederick Rindge Put Down Some Malibu Roots

The Adamson family were the last owners of the Malibu Spanish Land Grant, and constructed a house in 1929. The summer beach home, which was first used by the family in 1930 and is now the Historic Adamson House and Museum, is now part of Malibu Lagoon State Beach park. It has been called the ‘Taj Mahal of Tile’ due to its extensive use of decorative ceramic tiles created by Rufus Keeler of Malibu Potteries.


 
10.) Malibu Played An Important History During Prohibition

Directly below Point Dume Headlands Park in Malibu is an area called Pirates Cove, which was named that during Prohibition due to rum-runners using it to get booze on land. Enabling them to get their cargo on shore, the bootleggers loved the part of the beach because of how secluded it was. Pirate’s Cove was also used as a nude beach in years past, but nudity is illegal on all beaches in LA county, so no nudity is allowed these days!


 
Article by Jarone Ashkenazi

More From 93.1 Jack FM

Best Of Los Angeles
JACKtivites
Flashback Lunch

Listen Live